Entering Into God’s Rest by T. Austin-Sparks

Today’s blog post is a short article written by T. Austin-Sparks in 1940 on a topic that is very wonderful: Entering Into God’s Rest. I enjoy reading all of T. Austin-Sparks’ writings free at austin-sparks.net.

Before getting into T. Austin-Sparks’ article, I want to share a beautiful post from a brother in Christ, Quincy Zikmund. I highly recommend his blog post, Learning From The Body, at Divine Discontent. In this post, Quincy shares an experience of Christ’s Body that is often missing in popular Christianity; every member of the Body of Christ functioning equally.

Enjoy!

Entering Into God’s Rest 
by T. Austin-Sparks

Adam’s first day on this earth was a Sabbath day. God created man on the sixth day, and the first complete day that man had was the Sabbath, and that Sabbath day becomes the first day for man. Carried over to the New Testament, where God finishes and perfects His new creation work in the Lord Jesus, and enters into His rest, it is God’s Sabbath, and there we begin. That is our first day – God’s rest.

We begin in something that is already perfect. This is the ground of “the everlasting covenant”. To grasp the significance of that is to see what the “eternal covenant” is, to come right in on a perfect ground and start there. It is not how we regard ourselves or how we feel about it, but it is God’s place for us. The fact is, beloved, that in Jesus Christ you and I will never be more perfect than we are now. Those perfections may be wrought into us progressively, but, so far as the ground of our acceptance is concerned, we are “accepted in the Beloved One”, and He wholly satisfies the Father; the Father has come to rest in Him. The work is perfect.

Our acceptance is always on the ground of God’s end reached. Till that is settled, we have no steadying thing when God begins to work in us. Do not forget that. If, when God begins to deal with us in discipline and chastening, in training and moulding and formation, we begin at any moment to say, This is all because I am so bad, so wicked, and the Lord has got to do something with me in order that I may be acceptable, we have given our ground away. We shall never be more acceptable, however much the Lord does in us. We have been accepted, not on the ground of what we are, however bad or good that may be, but on the ground of The Beloved. “Accepted in the Beloved One”.

We sing – and I wish we would lay it to heart more and more – that His perfections are the measure of our own acceptance. That is where we start. Blessed be God, that is the ground of confidence, and when the Lord begins to take us in hand and we begin to feel what wretched creatures we are, that never implies for a single moment that we are not accepted. The eternal covenant means here, in the first place, that we are accepted on the ground of God’s satisfaction with His Son. If we were accepted on our own ground, where we stand in ourselves, there would be no eternal covenant, no ground of security at all. It would be a matter of how we might be tomorrow. But no, it is not a matter of how we are or shall be. The ground is settled in Christ. Now, God is only getting to work to make good in us what is true in His Son, but it does not change the ground. Do not let us give our ground away.

First published in “A Witness and A Testimony” magazine, Mar-Apr 1940, Vol 18-2

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Posted on June 9, 2012, in Exhortation and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. As a former Pharisee the Sabbaths weekly and annual were perplexing to me. I did not in any spiritual way comprehend much. In some ways there were a burden always striving to rest and not “work”, all the while doing this by works.

    Enter a glimpse of Christ and this takes on a much fuller, and deeper meaning. Christ is our Sabbath, we enter Him, and rest from our works, as it has been stated, “in Him we move and have our being”.

    In view of what Sparks has mentioned here it even has a cleared picture, We enter the Sabbath and this is the ground of acceptance, confidence, compassion, and all grace, and this is of course in and through Christ as our High Priest, and brother.

    Thank you peter for posting this, may you be blessed as you work in His fields.

  2. Thank you so much for your comment, Jim! I think that most of us have spent time striving for rest, not realizing that Christ is our Rest. May you and the entire Body enjoy Christ as the real Sabbath Rest.

  3. Reblogged this on Bohemian Seas and commented:
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